D2L Announces Delaware Tech’s Selection of Brightspace

D2L Announces Delaware Tech’s Selection of Brightspace

Yesterday, D2L formally announced Delaware Technical Community College’s selection of Brightspace to serve as the college’s learning management system of choice.

President and CEO of D2L, John Baker, shared in the announcement…

To reach every learner, higher learning institutions need to personalize their learning environments while streamlining the experience for faculty. We are proud to work with the leaders at Delaware Tech to do precisely that with Brightspace as their LMS.

Read the full announcement here.

Introducing Innovation Studios @ The George CCIT Lab

Introducing Innovation Studios @ The George CCIT Lab

 

The Delaware Tech CCIT and IIT departments are pleased to announce the grand opening of a state of the art recording studio for faculty use: Innovation Studios at the George CCIT Lab.

This dedicated workspace, equipped with a 22-inch pen display monitor, 60-inch interactive HD screen, and a variety of microphone options, provides everything you need to create video lectures, screencasts, podcasts, and other multimedia instructional presentations. Camtasia software installed at the studio enables post production tasks, such as clipping, audio mixing, and closed captioning.

Innovation Studios is open for all Delaware Tech faculty, from any campus, to reserve for use following an initial studio orientation.

Learn more on the CCIT website and start planning your next multimedia masterpiece today.

Tips to help prevent and manage cheating in the classroom

Tips to help prevent and manage cheating in the classroom

By Jennifer Williams
Human Services
Delaware Technical Community College
George Campus

Teaching comes with many rewards as well as some challenges.  One of the challenges many of us may face is how to handle when a student cheats on an exam.  We as instructors offer support to our students in a variety of ways to help them be successful on the exam.  This support can include interactive reviews, study guides, and insight on some of the essay exam questions that will be on the test.  As an instructor, when I became aware of a student cheating on an exam it made me ask why did the student cheat when I provided so many ways to help them be successful?  If the student was struggling why wouldn’t they reach out to me?  Is there anything more I could have done to help the class feel better prepared for the exam?  I have come to realize that cheating may be something that inevitably occurs in the college environment.  I have to remember that we are dealing with young adults who may struggle to accept responsibility for their failure to adequately prepare for the exam and resort to cheating out of desperation for what they believe will be a dire consequence if they fail the exam. After experiencing cheating from my own students, I decided to do some independent research to offer these tips to prevent and manage cheating in the classroom. Continue reading

Incorporating Service Learning into Human Services Courses

Incorporating Service Learning into Human Services Courses

By Malinda Hudson
Human Services
Delaware Technical Community College
Owens Campus

Sussex County is expanding with new housing developments breaking ground every day and new businesses generated to accommodate the needs of a larger population. People are choosing to migrate to this area, some for business, others for recreational purposes, and still others who have chosen to retire and enjoy their life of leisure near the beach. With that, services are also growing to meet the needs of the increased populace.  This steady growth in both businesses and residences has brought with it numerous opportunities to incorporate service learning into human services courses. Continue reading

Are We There Yet?

Are We There Yet?

By Rachelle Hawtof
Math Department
Delaware Technical Community College
George Campus

Ever gone on a really long car ride?  I don’t care how old you are, we all think the same thing at some point in the ride.  Are we there yet?  How much longer?

Unfortunately, I think this is the way many students feel about the developmental math classes they are required to take.  They don’t see the utility or the fun in mathematics.  Instead, it’s a long tedious drive.  Continue reading

Using a Free-Form Lab: Chaos or Learning?

Using a Free-Form Lab: Chaos or Learning?

By Erin Hanlon
Mechanical Engineering Department
Delaware Technical Community College
Stanton Campus

Recently in my Friday afternoon class (who thought Friday afternoon was a good time to lecture, anyway?), as students’ eyes glassed over, one of them asked that we do a lab instead of the lecture that I had planned.

Having not planned a lab activity for that day at all, initially I hesitated to deviate from my carefully constructed plan. I didn’t have anything to give them to do, so how would this work? Would we just be wasting an hour of class time playing around with the lab equipment? What could they possible get out of this?

Knowing that flexibility is important (and realizing that I had already lost at least half of the students’ attention, anyway), I decided to allow the class to spend the remainder of their time working collaboratively in a ‘free lab’ setting. I gave some general guidelines so that they would be using their time constructively and using the equipment safely, but otherwise, I let them create their own goals and expectations. Once they had decided what they were trying to accomplish, I approved their plan and they started building.

In all of the previous labs that we had done in class, the students had very specific directions and measurements that were required. They weren’t coming up with suggestions or designing their own experiments.

When working during their free lab time, students were allowed to set things up and see how they worked differently when changes were made. They had the chance to notice how the decisions that they made based on their previous coursework altered their outcomes. They were also forced to justify their choices and think about the decisions that they were making instead of strictly following the steps provided to them.

I found that using a free lab approach provided a valuable lesson in problem solving and hypothesizing that was missing from the previous lab exercises. Students were able to exercise their system design skills and see that it wasn’t just plopping together a bunch of pieces to see what works. This was a much better representation of what technicians or engineers would be doing in the ‘real world,’ and having them get a glimpse of that in the classroom was very valuable.

This is a lesson that I will implement with intention into future courses. I believe it was successful in providing hands-on learning in a format different from what students were used to being exposed to and more realistic to what they can expect in the future.

Tips for Making Amazing Videos on Your Smart Phone

Tips for Making Amazing Videos on Your Smart Phone

By Jerry Pearson
Center for Creative Instruction & Technology
Delaware Technical Community College
Terry Campus

Whether you are recording live footage in your classroom to add to your teaching portfolio, making an educational demonstration for your students, or just snapping a quick video for fun–these tips should help you get the most out of your smart phone’s video recorder. Continue reading

The Mindset Module in Education: Helping Students to Find Their Big Why

The Mindset Module in Education: Helping Students to Find Their Big Why

By Ish Stabosz
Center for Creative Instruction & Technology
Delaware Technical Community College
Stanton Campus

If you are a hobbyist, an entrepreneur, or just a lifelong learner looking to explore new territories of expertise, you may have come across one of the ten million online courses floating around the internet.

Usually it happens like this. You’re interested in golf or something, so you do a search on Google for something golf-related. You click around on a few sites. Then for the next SEVEN MONTHS you get targeted with ads on Facebook, Google, Instagram, and Twitter for some online program that will help you master your golf swing or something like that.

Okay, maybe my examples aren’t exactly dripping with showing details. Obviously, I’m not a golfer. Continue reading

Opening Lines of Communication to Get Students to Take Responsibility for Their Actions

megan-wagaman-no-excuses

By Megan Wagaman
Math Department
Delaware Technical Community College
George Campus

Recently, the research discussion group of the Stanton/George Instructional Innovation Committee met to discuss an article by Scott Gaier titled Understanding Why Students Do What They Do: Using Attribution Theory to Help Students Succeed Academically. In this post, I wanted to share some highlights from the article as well as a the fruits of our group discussion.

One of the greatest challenges in helping students learn is identifying why they do what they do.

Scott Gaier, 2015

Attribution theory, developed by Bernard Weiner, was extensively investigated throughout the 1970s, and is still used today, partly in an attempt to meet this challenge.

The main idea behind attribution theory is that we naturally attribute causes to behaviors we observe; these “attributions” we make about students affect how we handle issues. Attributions made by students (their explanations for their own failure or success) affect how they handle these same issues. Attributions can be a factor in motivation and willingness to expend effort.

The article emphasized that to best help students, teachers need to understand to what a student attributes his or her success or failure, so that the teacher can guide a student to perhaps a better understanding of the situation, and appropriate interventions. As Gaier notes, “ … the more a teacher understands the cause for a student’s behavior, the more likely and able the teacher is to influence the student’s future behavior and decision making.”

For example, if a student thinks he fails all the tests in a class because the class meets at 8:30 and he is not a morning person, the teacher could help the student understand that, morning person or not, the student needs to study, do homework, and thoughtfully review class material — maybe at a time of day when he can better process it.

Essentially, we can push students towards success by helping them get past faulty attributions and take responsibility.

The article emphasized communication and caring as the keys to help students and teachers understand actual reasons underlying observed results.

Our discussion centered on the implications of this idea. How can we help students take responsibility for their learning? How can we find out what students think are underlying causes of lack of success (what students are attributing low achievement to)? How can we help students make the right sort of effort for success?

We did not arrive at one fail-safe method, but we kept coming back to the importance of keeping communication lines open, and how to best do this. It may be by stopping class 5 or 10 minutes early every session so that students know that is an easy time that they can talk to a teacher.

It could be by collecting an “exit ticket” at the end of each class that students hand to you personally, so you have at least a brief personal interaction with each and every one of them.

It could be sending check-in emails to students who have missed class or fallen behind — maybe with a “hope everything is OK” or something that could open the door for them to say more, without opening the door for excuses.

It could be though a quick Google Form survey to see how the each member of the class is doing with course content and expectations.

It could be just finding those casual moments to say hi or have a brief conversation with students, and being sure they realize that coming for help is not a sign of weakness. I

Or, it could simply be remaining ready and aware to not let those teachable, communication-opening moments pass by. Once communication begins, we can help students focus on the factors they can control, help them understand what constitutes effort, and let them know we care.

Gaier concludes with three key take-aways. First, he stresses that “Just having an awareness of attribution theory … is important for teaching and learning.” Second, once we have developed this awareness, “… it is very important to have student-teacher interactions that encourage and foster good communication… teachers need to genuinely care about students and the students’ learning.” Finally, during these interactions, “we need to be willing to be wrong,” and change our beliefs about the reasons for students’ behavior.

Students are ultimately the ones who set their own goals and priorities, and establish their study methods, but by keeping our minds open to their attributions for events, we can help students learn to better manage their situations to find success.


Reference

Gaier, S. E. (2015). Understanding why students do what they do: Using Attribution Theory to help students succeed academically. Research and Teaching in Developmental Education, 31(2), 6 – 19.

Happy National Online Learning Day!

onlinelearningday-rick-kralevich

If you didn’t know it, today is National Online Learning Day, a day to celebrate and showcase success of online education. Online Learning Day is a chance to recognize that online environments provide students the opportunity to learn almost anything, from anywhere, at any time.

If you’ve taken a class online or taught one–whether for academic, professional, or personal development–we encourage you to share your successes on your favorite social media platforms and include the hashtag #OnlineLearningDay.

Learned a skill online that you thought could only be taught face-to-face?

Developed a really great online lesson?

Discovered a piece of ed tech that took your online course over the top?

Have a tip for succeeding in online learning environments?

If you can answer YES to any of these questions or similar ones, then you’ve got something to share.

onlinelearningday-kelly-mcveigh-stanley

Here at CCIT, we tossed a few ideas around of what we’d like to share when it comes to online learning. Here are a few suggestions from our director, Kelly McVeigh Stanley, about alternatives to discussion boards in online classes:

Student Video Blogs: Not just a substitute for discussion boards. Student videos assignments can be designed through a process of “Know, See, Do, Improve”. Students demonstrate their knowledge, build observation skills overtime, and are then asked to analyze their own work.

Live Streamed Lectures: Using tools like YouTube Live, Adobe Connect, and Google Hangouts is a great way to mimic face-to-face exchanges and connect with your students. Record these sessions for students who can’t attend.

Encourage Reflection through Student Self-Assessment: Self-assessment rubrics and online journals allow for reflective thinking about course content. Self-assessment aligns with the theory of student-centered learning and helps students take ownership of their involvement in the learning process

Encourage Sharing: Leverage social media tools. Have students use a course specific hashtag to share their resources and experiences related to the course. Use a tool like Tagboard, Keyhole, or Hashatit to monitor student activity across multiple social media apps.

onlinelearningday-al-drushler

And Learning Strategies Coordinator, Al Drushler, offers the following tips for running an online class that keeps students focused on success:

  • Make the course schedule and grade center visible prior to the start of the semester.
  • Keep due dates consistent throughout the semester (for example, homework is due every Sunday at 11:59 PM).
  • Respond to student questions about coursework using short screen casts and publish them for the entire class to see.
  • Create a discussion board for questions about the course work and encourage students to post there rather than emailing questions to you individually.

What about you? What are some of your tips, successes, and positive experiences with online learning. Share in the comments to let us know, and don’t forget to hop on your favorite social media platform and use the hashtag #OnlineLearningDay to share your thoughts with the rest of the country this National Online Learning Day.