Get Your VERB On!

Get Your VERB On!

By Dr. Richard Kralevich
Associate Vice President for Information and Instructional Technology
Delaware Technical Community College

In 1956, Benjamin Bloom and a few of his colleagues had a thought.  Their idea – develop a framework that educators and student alike could leverage to better organize and understand the learning objectives associated with their shared educational experience.  Since that faithful day, educators like you and me have devoted countless hours discussing, debating, and deliberating over how to find the right verb for the job.

Recently, I came across a few visual representations of Bloom’s Taxonomy that might help to make that deliberation a little easier. Hopefully, these resources will come in handy the next time you’re struggling to pen that perfect instructional objective.

So get out there and get your verb on!

A 3 Dimensional Model Of Bloom’s Taxonomy
Source: teachthought

Take Action: Verbs That Define Bloom’s Taxonomy
Source: MindShift | KQED News

Bloom’s Taxonomy Overview
Source: Vanderbilt University’s Center for Teaching

“Go Forth and Reuse!”

By Ish Stabosz
Center for Creative Instruction & Technology
Delaware Technical Community College
Stanton Campus

Last month, the New York Public Library announced the addition of almost 200,000 items to their digital collections. In their announcement, they make it clear that these are free to use without restriction with the following words:

No permission required, no hoops to jump through: just go forth and reuse!

Ever wonder how 1857 New York City was laid out?

NYC 1857

Or maybe what floor plans looked like in the early 1900s?

Floor Plan 1900s

Or how MIT classrooms were designed more than a century ago?

MIT classroom

The collection is big, and it provides some great material for use in your lessons. Consider how your discipline has changed in the past century? What conversations could you start with your students using an artifact that shows that change?

Explore the collection your self at http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/ and share your finds in the comments.